Terms & Conditions

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Privacy and Cookies

We may change this privacy notice from time to time by updating this page.

What information do we collect?

When you use this website, we may collect the following information:

  • the areas of the website that you visit
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We do this by using cookies, which are small files that help us track how our visitors use the website and enable us to understand where we can improve your experience. If you would like to find out which cookies we use and the information they track see our Cookies Policy.

Once you submit or register information through our website we will know who you are and your activities on this website and information about you and/or your company may be recorded on our systems. For example, we may ask for personal information when you download our software including:

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We may also collect personal information from telephone calls and/or other correspondence with you.

What do we do with the information we collect?

The information we capture is used for various purposes. The main purpose is to provide you with our services (whether available via the website or offline). We also use the information for:

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Marketing

We would like to provide you with information about our services and other information which we think you may find interesting. We may send you such information by post, email and/or telephone, unless you have asked us not to do so.

We will not provide your personal information to other organisations for marketing purposes without your explicit consent.

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Who do we share this information with?

We may share your personal information with companies acting on our behalf who will only use the information to provide that service. However, we will retain control of your data and any third party service provider that we use must act in accordance with our instructions. We may also share your personal information with a purchaser or potential purchaser of our business.

In some circumstances, we may have to disclose your personal information by law, because a court or the police or other law enforcement agency has asked us for it.

How to get copies of or amend the information we have collected

You may request details of the personal information that we hold about you under data protection laws. If you would like a copy of the information held about you please write to us at oasys@arup.com or at: Data Protection Officer, 13 Fitzroy Street, London, UK, W1T 4BQ. Please note that we may charge a small £10 administration fee for information requests.

If you think any information we have about you is incorrect or incomplete, please email us as soon as possible. We will correct or update any information as soon as we can.

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Data Security

We are committed to ensuring that your information is secure. In order to prevent unauthorised access or disclosure we have put in place suitable physical, electronic and managerial procedures to safeguard and secure the information we collect, including locked cabinets, electronic password protection and pass card access to buildings.

If at any point you suspect or receive a suspicious communication from someone suggesting they work for Oasys or a website claiming to be affiliated with Oasys, please forward the communication to us or report the incident by email to oasys@arup.com or in writing to Oasys, 13 Fitzroy Street, London, UK, W1T 4BQ as soon as possible.

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Website Terms and Conditions

The contents of this web site are protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights under international conventions. No copying of any words, images, graphic representations or other information contained in this web site is permitted without the prior written permission of the webmaster for this site.

Oasys accepts no responsibility for the content of any external site that links to or from this site.

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Software Licensing Terms

Terms and Conditions of Purchase

The full conditions of purchase and maintenance for all Oasys software are set out in the Oasys Software Licence and Support Agreement. All prices are subject to TAX at the current rate.

Prices and specifications are subject to change without notice – please ask for a written quotation.

Although every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of all information contained herein, the contents do not form or constitute a representation, warranty, or part of any contract.

Superseded Versions of Terms and Conditions

Oasys keeps copies of all superseded versions of its terms and conditions.

Maintenance & Support Services

Twelve months support and maintenance is included with most products. Thereafter maintenance is typically 20% of the current sales price.

An annual maintenance service is available for most programs after the first year.

This service includes:

  • telephone/fax/email/web based support
  • free software updates available via internet download
  • personalised output header for many products

Xdisp FAQs

Find the answer to frequently asked questions from existing users.

Most popular FAQs

The CIRIA C580 relationships have mostly been derived from ground movements measured during installation of piles and excavations that have been carried out in London Clay. Please refer back to CIRIA C580 to review whether the case studies used reflect the construction that is proposed to be modelled in Xdsip. The CIRIA relationships are not appropriate for sub-surface displacements.

There are two potential methods to model shafts in Xdisp. Both have limitations/drawbacks.

The first method is to define a shaft in the ‘embedded wall excavation’ function. An approximate shaft shape is defined in the excavation details tab. The user then specifies an appropriate relationship for surface and sub-surface ground movement. This could be based upon measured data, for example New and Bowers (1994), or from carrying out other analyses.

The alternative method is to specify a number of very short tunnel sections (say 1m length) stacked vertically on top of each other to the proposed depth of the shaft. The total volume of the tunnel sections should equal the total volume excavated for the shaft. Reasonably close matches have been achieved between measured settlement data from New and Bowers (1994) and the results from Xdisp. Generally a high k value and low volume loss has been used to achieve these correlations. No validation has been carried out to check whether sub-surface displacements or horizontal displacements are appropriate.

References

  1. New B. M. and Bowers K. H. (1994). Ground movement validation at the Heathrow Express Trial Tunnel, Proc. IMM Tunnelling ’94, Chapman and Hall, pp 301-327

Where soil is influenced by more than one excavation, the displacement may be greater than the sum of the calculated displacements. Soil stiffness is strain dependent, therefore later elements of work may give rise to larger displacements. See Nyren et al (2001).

References

  1. Nyren R J, Standing J R and Burland J B (2002). Surface displacement at St James’s Park Greenfield reference site above twin tunnels through the London Clay. Chapter 25 of CIRIA publication, Building response to tunnelling. Case studies from construction of the Jubilee Line Extension, London, Vol. 2 case studies.

All FAQs

Consider the corner of an excavation whose adjoining walls have different stiffnesses. Wall A is stiffer than Wall B.

 

The horizontal component of surface ground movement alongside Wall A is 10mm towards the excavation. The same movement alongside Wall B is 100mm towards the excavation. The area in the arc of the corner, shown grey in the plan below, experiences horizontal movements influenced by Walls A and B. What are the directions and magnitudes of those horizonal movements? CIRIA C580 gives no guidance. Xdisp 19.4 Build 6 uses a different approach to that of 19.4 Build 5.

Plan of Corner of Excavation

Xdisp 19.4 Build 5

Xdisp 19.4 Build 6

Plan Plan
     
 Magnitude (of horizontal displacement)  Magnitude (of horizontal displacement)
   

 

where

 

and

 

 

Direction (of horizontal displacement)  Direction (of horizontal displacement)
 

 

The output from Xdisp shown below illustrates the differences in the resulting horizontal displacements around such corners for both methods.  In this example the north and west walls are stiffer than the south and east.

 

 

Xdisp 19.4 Build 5

Xdisp 19.4 Build 6

Horizontal X Displacements  Horizontal X Displacements
   
Horizontal Y Displacements  Horizontal Y Displacements
   
Vertical Z Displacements (no difference)  Vertical Z Displacements (no difference)
   
 Horizontal Displacements  Horizontal Displacements
 
 Resultant Displacements  Resultant Displacements
   

 

 

Note the discrete bulbs of movement around the south-west corner (for horizontal X displacements) and the north-east corner (for horizontal Y displacements) shown in the results from Xdisp 19.4 Build 5.  These are the result of horizontal movements due to the less stiff walls influencing the results in the area of the corner. They do not occur in the revised method used in Xdisp 19.4 Build 6.

Warning: This answer provides methodology which should be used with careful engineering judgment.  It will result in calculations of soil movements below the ground surface merely as a proportion of those at the surface and is unlikely to be accurate in many situations. It is recommended that sub-surface curves are derived instead from field data or from finite element model results as discussed in the tutorial Guidance on how to create a sub-surface curve using 2D FE Analysis.

 

If, after careful consideration, it is thought valid to model sub-surface ground movements as a simple proportion of the surface movements, then the following steps may be taken to create sub-surface ground movement curves from surface ground movement curves.

 

(1) Copy the chosen surface movement curve to a new user-defined curve.

 

(2) Select the new curve in the Ground Movement Curves dialog’s droplist and set its type to “Surface and sub-surface movements” and its curve fitting method to “Linear interpolation”

 

(3) Add a series of points representing zero movement at full wall/excavation depth. This is most simply done by copying the existing surface points (by highlighting the range of points in the data table, then right-click “Copy”, then right-click “Paste” into the first blank field at the end of the table.

 

(4) Modify the new values in the second column (“Depth/wall depth or max. excavation depth (y)”) to “1” (or to another value which represents the depth at which you wish movements to converge to zero, and the new values in the third column (“Settlement/wall depth…” or “Horizontal movement/wall depth…”) to “0”

(5) … and “Apply” the changes.

 

 

(5) Review the graph

 

 

With reference to the warning above, note the difference between the graph of a typical sub-surface movement curve created in this way (above) and the graph of a sample sub-surface movement curve created by a finite element analysis with more detailed knowledge and specification of the soil stratigraphy (below). A sample of the latter is provided with the program. Its derivation is described in the help file (see section “Sample Sub-surface Ground Movement Curve”).  The comparison of these graphs shows that maximum movements may, in reality for some situations, occur below the ground surface, whereas the method described above will produce maximum movements at the ground surface.